Vulnerability Assessment

Evaluation of the sensitivity of the species to change, its adaptive potential to deal with the change and is it at risk to experience those changes.

Desert LCC Funded Project: Climate Adaptation Strategies for Desert Amphibians Paper and Web Modules

Dr. Kerry Griffis-Kyle produced a peer-reviewed publication and content that produced adaptation strategies for desert amphibians. This work is associated with addressing Desert LCC Critical Management Question 4: Physiological Stress of Climate Change and follows a webinar that Dr. Griffis-Kyle presented for the Desert LCC’s CMQ 4 team, titled “Climate and Desert Amphibian Physiology:  A Resource for Planning Adaptation Strategies.”

 

Main goals:

  • Coordinate information flow between scientists and managers
  • Support research that will address management needs at the landscape scale

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Resources and Tools:

SAVS

SAVS: A System for Assessing Vulnerability of Species to Climate Change uses an online questionnaire with 22 criteria to predict vulnerability or population response of species to provide a framework for assessing vulnerability to future climate change. The 22 multiple-choice questions are grouped into four categories by theme: habitat, physiology, phenology and biotic interactions. The questionnaire is completed using information gathered from published materials, personal knowledge, or expert consultation.

Climate Change Vulnerability Index

The NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index identifies plant and animal species that are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Using the Index, you apply readily available information about a species’ natural history, distribution and landscape circumstances to predict whether it will likely suffer a range contraction and/or population reductions due to climate change. You can use the Index as part of a variety of analyses, including assessing the relative risk of species listed in State Wildlife Action Plans or part of any assessment of the vulnerability of species to climate change.

Image of Projecting Climate Effects on Birds and Reptiles of the Southwestern United States cover page

Charles van Riper III, James R. Hatten, J. Tom Giermakowski, David Mattson, Jennifer A. Holmes, Matthew J. Johnson, Erika M. Nowak, Kirsten Ironside, Michael Peters, Paul Heinrich, K. L. Cole, C. Truettner, and Cecil R. Schwalbe

Projecting Climate Effects on Birds and Reptiles of the Southwestern United States

Link to Report